Processing Tanzania animals and travel

by Rob Tiller

Baboons in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania

I’m still working my way through my photos from Tanzania, and processing impressions from the trip.  We saw a lot of animals!  In some situations, I took dozens of pictures, and it’s tough to decide which is my final favorite.  

Anyhow, here are a few current favorites.  What I was looking for was more than just the beauty and strangeness of the animals.  The trip helped me appreciate better that their lives are part of complex relationships with their fellow creatures and their environments.  

But the much bigger point is Tanzania is a fascinating place.  Getting there from the U.S. is hard on a body, at least if you’re not in an ultra high-end airline seat/bed.  It took us about 36 hours from airport to airport each way.  We flew on Qatar Airways, which treated us better than our recent U.S. carriers.  It had planes with seats that didn’t seem specially engineered to torture you and flight attendants who seemed to view their job as helping passengers.    

An impala — a delicate, speedy creature that loves grass

On long flights, I’m usually not able to sleep much, but I look forward to having extra time for reading.   There comes a point, though, even for a big reader like me, when the eyes and mind get too tired for reading.  Instead, recently, on planes equipped with individual screens, I watch movies.  I try to pick ones that Sally probably wouldn’t be interested in, and ones that haven’t made my must-see list.  The point is to achieve a state of mild engagement/distraction – enough so as not think about how many more hours before I can get off the plane.  

Cape buffalo — a stolid creature that also loves grass

Part of the point of Qatar Airways seems to be to raise the profile of that little country and get international travelers into its hub airport at Doha.  We had long layovers there going and coming, and it was impressive, in a post-modern way.  Even in the middle of the night, shops, restaurants, and bars were open, and the assemblage of luxury goods stores (handbags, watches, jewelry, clothing, luggage) reminded me of Fifth Avenue, or Zermott.  We were a bit confused about the value of the local currency, and so managed to set a new high-end record for an airport meal in their Italian restaurant.

We also had a long layover in London’s Heathrow airport on the way home.  There had recently been reports about Heathrow’s poor operations in handling passengers and baggage, but we had no special problems, other than a very slow line at a coffee shop.   

One thing I confirmed coming back was that it’s definitely worthwhile on long trips to wear compression socks.  I’d worn a pair on the way over, but mine were among the items lost when our tent at Serian Serengeti North was blown away.  Regular socks just didn’t cut it.  When I got back to Raleigh, my ankles had swollen dramatically, and were very sore.  For my next trip, I got a replacement set from an outfit called Vim and Vigr.  

Leopard in Serengeti National Park

As to that storm:  we were out late in the day on the savannah close to the Kenya border watching a pair of lions, which seemed to be considering whether to take another nap or go for a hunt.  We had great close views, but the cats weren’t doing much.  As the sun started to set, huge dark clouds rolled in, and we started the long drive back to camp.

Lions waking up

A few minutes later came the first drops of a deluge.  Our guides unfolded the canvas top and plastic windows of the 4Runner and put up the windshield.  Visibility quickly dropped to near zero, while the winds picked up.  Then we began to have lightning flashes and thunder close by every few seconds.  Our driver asked if I thought it was OK to stop, and I said I saw no other choice.  It looked entirely possible that we would not be able to make it back to camp that night.

Not long after, visibility improved enough to move forward, and our driver managed to get us through some creeks that had gotten a lot deeper since the earlier crossing.  We came across a vehicle that was stuck in the mud, and tried unsuccessfully to push them out of their rut.  Finally we got back to the camp.  We were happy to be there, but everyone else was in a state of high anxiety, trying to figure out how much of the camp had been destroyed.  

Alex Walker and his dedicated team managed to feed us a satisfying hot meal in one of the two remaining dining tents, and worked through the night assessing damage and starting repairs.  Our tent had been flooded and blown away, but most of our possessions were eventually found.  The staff worked hard cleaning and drying things while we were out on our last game drive the following day.

Of course, it’s always good to get home.  We’ve been watching some documentaries this week, and I wanted to particularly recommend one:  Eating Our Way to Extinction.  It’s a powerful summary of the problems with our animal agriculture system, and especially the part it plays in climate change.  The presentation is upbeat, with narration by Kate Winslett and cameos by several celebrities.  It emphasizes that it is not too late to change the system, and we as individuals can help.  

Thompson’s gazelle — also a speedy grass lover

One last thing:  I read a good book on the trip:  The Grapes of Wrath, by John Steinbeck.  In my teens and twenties I made a point of reading quite a few officially recognized “classics,” which may or may not have been the best use of my time.  In any case, Grapes is one that I never got to, and I came to it without a lot of assumptions.

The book tells the story of a poor farm family forced from their farm in Oklahoma and hoping for a new life in California.  Their story is both specific (each character is an individual) and general (there are many thousands in their predicament).  I was pulled along by the classic story telling, but also got a better understanding of the economic and social forces that created their desperate poverty along with dramatic wealth for a few.

Cheetahs in Serengeti

I was surprised at how timely the book seemed, as climate change and political upheaval unleashes enormous migration around the globe.  Steinbeck helps us process these kinds of forces, and encourages us to show compassion and work on solutions.